A Travellerspoint blog

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Touring Barbados

One Day at a Time


View Five Visits to Barbados & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Farley Hill decorated for Bajan Independance Day - Barbados

Farley Hill decorated for Bajan Independance Day - Barbados

We had such a good time in Bermuda on Thanksgiving 1995 (and successfully evaded the question about whose house we would spend Thanksgiving at) that I looked around for another island to spend Thanksgiving of 1996. I settled on Barbados because it looked like a safe place to visit with a lot of interesting places to see. I got a lot of books out of the library including "Don't Stop the Carnival" by Herman Wouk (which helped give my husband the proper attitude for the Caribbean), and the journal written by one of the first white indentured servant settlers. I made reservations for the Edgewater Inn over the internet. They were having a surfing competition on Bathsheba beach at the time and some of the surfers stayed at the Edgewater. The east coast in general has a lot of rocks and undertow and swimming is not safe in a lot of places. But it is cooler and quieter on the east coast.

On this trip, the photos were taken by a point and shoot film camera.
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Subsequently, we came by cruise ship - twice in 2006 on the Holland American line Maasdam, once the following year (2007) on the NCL Pearl , and the last time on the Maasdam in 2013 . By this time I had a digital camera.

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Posted by greatgrandmaR 17:00 Archived in Barbados Comments (0)

Flying In and the First Day

Wednesday, November 27, 1996


View Five Visits to Barbados & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

When we went to Costa Rica in January of 1995, we flew on a "pass". That is we were non-rev (non-revenue) passengers with no seat reservations. We could only fly if there were empty seats. Bob found it stressful not to know if he would actually get a seat, so this time we flew on discounted tickets that our daughter the pilot purchased for us (We reimbursed her). The round trip tickets for the two of us, with our 20% discount were $615.90 ($307.95 each)

This time also, I arranged leave and the flights far enough in advance so that we didn't have to fly out on Tuesday and come back home on the Saturday after Thanksgiving like we did from Bermuda because all the Wednesday, Sunday and Monday flights were full. This time we flew (via Miami) on Tuesday Nov 26, and stayed a full week until December 3rd. I booked a double river-side over the internet which allowed us to have a discount. A week cost us $1250.00 for the week for a river side room.
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We arrived late on the evening of Tuesday November 26, 1996.
We exchanged $216.00 US for Barbados dollars in the airport - we got B$400.00 The rate is fixed at B$1.98 to $1.00 US, so it is almost B$2 to $1 US or IOW, you can divide all the B$ amounts in half. The charge at the airport for changing the money was about $15.00US

Because I was afraid (and I was proved correct) that we would not be able to get to our hotel in an unfamiliar place in the dark where they drive on the left, we were going to take a taxi. There was a dispatcher at the airport who assigned the passengers to the drivers. The one in line when we arrived did NOT want to drive all the way to the east coast to the (Edgewater hotel in Bathsheba ). because he thought his nice van would be damaged by the potholes on the roads out in the hinterlands. But the dispatcher made him take us. He honked whenever he came to an intersection (the sugar cane was very tall and would block a car coming from the other side). He charged us B$50.00 and we gave him B$10 tip. We were supposed to have dinner on arrival included, and they had left sandwiches. We tipped the waiter B$1.00. We checked in the next day.

Riverside view

Riverside view


We had a riverside room, which was cheaper than the ocean view rooms. But really we could see the ocean if we looked across the Barbados shaped pool. . It was a nice pool, and I swam in it a couple of times. We could walk from the pool down some steps onto the beach.

From pool (Barbados shaped) to hotel

From pool (Barbados shaped) to hotel


The door to our room opened onto a covered deck from which you could see the "river". It was a bit smelly. There were stairs down to the main floor. The TV was down in the lounge near the front desk
Green river below the stairs to the lobby

Green river below the stairs to the lobby


Our bed - Bathsheba

Our bed - Bathsheba


The bed was quite large and the bathroom had a shower. The room was air conditioned, but at that time of year we didn't use it much. There was a radio on a shelf next to a wardrobe. This was a reproduction radio as it had the capability of playing audio tapes. We did listen to the radio quite a bit included listening to live sports broadcasts (cricket etc), and also the reports of the parade held in celebration of 30 years of independence for Barbados. There was a phone in the room
Wardrobe and radio - Barbados

Wardrobe and radio - Barbados

Wednesday, November 27th. Breakfast at the hotel was included in the price -We ate on the deck overlooking the coast.
Bob at Breakfast on the porch - Barbados

Bob at Breakfast on the porch - Barbados


From the deck

From the deck

Looking down on the rocks in front of the hotel

Looking down on the rocks in front of the hotel


The hotel arranged for Top Car rental car people to come to the hotel to rent us our car. The rental car people issued to us the mandatory temporary driver's permit which cost $5 US each and is valid for a period of 2 months. The smallest cars are called "mokes' and they do not have a roof. We did not rent a moke because of two reasons -
1) it is likely to rain in November and
2) I wanted to be able to lock stuff in the car when we were parked on the street. A lockable car was a little bit more expensive, but I thought it was worth it.
The car we rented. - Barbados

The car we rented. - Barbados

I didn't think to rent an automatic transmission car. When you are accustomed to a left hand drive car, and you have to shift to driving a right hand drive car on the left, your right hand will automatically go to shift and what you will get is the window winder instead of the gear shift.
Entrance to the Edgewater in 2006

Entrance to the Edgewater in 2006


These are the instructions on the Top Car website for driving in Barbados.

1. We drive on the LEFT, keep your vehicle on the LEFT side of the road at all times for a more enjoyable holiday!

 Highway - driving on the left

Highway - driving on the left


Another picture from the passenger's seat

Another picture from the passenger's seat

If you forget, it is helpful to have a passenger who will shout "Left LEFT!!" as the oncoming bus is about to crush you.

2. We have several round-abouts (circles in the road with traffic spinning around it at all times!) that you will navigate on your journeys. Always look to your right as you approach the round-about as those vehicles to your right have the right-of-way and are not going to stop for you … they are going through no matter what!  Once there are no cars coming on your right you then need to look to your left because at several of these round-abouts there are pedestrian crossings immediately to the left!! Don’t ask me why, but they are there so check to make sure there is no one scurrying across the crosswalk prior to taking off!!
 Roundabout - Clockwise

Roundabout - Clockwise

Give Way

Give Way


3. Try not to hit every “pot hole” (Bajan for large crater in the road!)… there are many of these pot holes of varying sizes and depths that you will encounter and they have been known to wreak havoc on tyres and rims!! We tend to prefer if our rims are returned to us in the same circular shape they were provided to you as opposed to more of a square shape!!
 
4. Try not to careen into a ditch at the side of the road because a large blue bus is coming at you!! Just keep to your side (… the LEFT side!), they will keep to their side and all will be well in paradise! You can stop if you want to and shut your eyes as they pass if it makes you feel better!
 in the rain - oncoming bus

in the rain - oncoming bus


5. If you are following behind a ZR van (white van with a maroon stripe around the middle) keep your eye on the ZR van at all times (… do not blink!!) and expect it to stop at the most unexpected times!! They stop at every person walking at the side of the road, or they stop just for idle conversation with another ZR driver coming in the opposite direction!!
 
6. Try not to park your car under a coconut tree – those little green nuts are deceptively heavy and have been known to cause large craters in unsuspecting car roofs .. and the occasional head too!
 
7. Do not be discouraged with these driving tips because you will be driving a hired car with a blue “H” license plate and all the locals give hired cars a wide berth as they know you are on unfamiliar ground!!

Most of the time there isn't a problem. On the rural roads, there's no one else around to hit. On the few divided highways, the only problem is that you pass on the right instead of the left. And since the cars are RHD (right hand drive) you will be in an unfamiliar seat and it will remind you that you should stay to the left. Try to stay out of rush hour which is usually from generally from 7:00-8:30am and from 4:30-5:30pm. There are two significant problems though. Making a left turn you may forget to allow for the majority of the car to be to your left rather than your right. And the other problem is the roundabouts.
poinsettias growing wild

poinsettias growing wild


After we got the car rented, we drove down to the Barbados Museum
Barbados museum

Barbados museum


and walked around the museum.
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Horse statue and tapestry

Horse statue and tapestry


While we were there, we bought a Heritage Pass and a detailed wall map of Barbados which proved quite useful - this was before common usage of GPS.

The Barbados Heritage Passport allowed free admission to the Gun Hill Signal Station, Morgan Lewis Sugar Mill, the Arbib Nature and Heritage Trail and Bridgetown Synagogue. And there was a reduced admission for Andromeda Botanical Gardens, Welchman Hall Gully, Tyrol Cot Heritage Village, Barbados Museum, and the Sir Frank Hutson Sugar Museum.

We wanted to eat some Bajan foods, so we had a Bajan lunch buffet at Brown Sugar (lunch is cheaper than dinner).
Brown Sugar sign in 2006

Brown Sugar sign in 2006


We went into Bridgetown and after we found a parking place,
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we went to Cave Shepard (a department store - I wanted to shop here because of the unusual name)
People on the street in front of the store

People on the street in front of the store


and Columbian Emeralds and shopped. It was hard to find a place to park.
Parking lot - Bridgetown

Parking lot - Bridgetown


When we parked (parking is expensive and we never found the parking garage back of Cave Shepherd) on the street, a man in uniform came up and told us we had to pay. I'm not sure but I think he was some type of traffic warden. I bought a good map for driving around in the car at Page's bookstore. I got crystal from the UK for my DIL's birthday from the gift shop. I got emerald jewelry for my daughter whose birthday is in May from the Columbian Emerald outlet in the store.

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Then we drove up to Cattlewash. Cattlewash is one of the longest beaches in Barbados. The area is now very popular with Bajans for a get away in the summer. It is very scenic and relaxing, but there are strong currents, and swimming in the open water is not recommended.

In the old days, wealthy visitors came To Barbados to take advantage of the healthy climate. Cattlewash was one of the best known health resort areas because of the climate and fresh breezes. George Washington sent his half brother to Barbados to fight against a severe lung infection.

We had dinner at Kingsley House. The restaurant is at a very small hotel. It has only 6 rooms and 1 suite. The food was good but I thought the people were a bit snobbish.

There is a review by Charles L. Mitsakos from a Boston paper which says:

"Lunch at the Kingsley Club in Cattlewash lived up to its reputation as one of the 10 most interesting restaurants in the Caribbean. From a planter's punch to its Bajan flying fish and coconut meringue pie, the Kingsley brought a fitting ending to a memorable morning on the island.

Expenses for today
A continental breakfast each morning was free.

The car rental people came to the hotel to do the paperwork, and it cost us B$460 to rent a small hard top (not a minimoke) for a week. Licenses were an additional B$10 each.

First we went to the Barbados museum and got a Heritage Passport which was B$36.00 each. We also bought a better Barbados map for B$20.00

Filling up the car - we paid B$29.00 for 19 litres of fuel

We went to the Brown Sugar for lunch. It cost B$63.00 plus B$5.00 tip.

Drove to Bridgetown
Parking B$ tip to attendant for parking on the street B$2.00

Shopping at Cave Shepard
Barbados map B$19.95
Gifts

  • cut glass candlesticks B$87.00 plus B$25.00 shipping
  • emerald earrings B$215.00
  • topaz ring B$140.00

Dinner at Kingsley Club B$120.00

Posted by greatgrandmaR 21:15 Archived in Barbados Tagged shopping museum barbados car_rental Comments (0)

28 November 1996 Thanksgiving

Bajan's Don't Celebrate USA Thanksgiving.


View Five Visits to Barbados & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Thursday 28 November 1996 (Thanksgiving Day).

Today we set out to visit several of the places on our Heritage Pass. We drove north along the coast, visited Morgan Lewis Sugar Mill. At the time of our visit in 1996, the Morgan Lewis Mill was not really open (and there was no entrance fee so the Heritage Pass wasn't much help) although we could look at it from the outside. The office was in a trailer and was not open.
Danger sign at Morgan Lewis Mill

Danger sign at Morgan Lewis Mill


Morgan Lewis Mill machinery

Morgan Lewis Mill machinery

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Now that it has been renovated it is called one of the Seven Wonders of Barbados. It is one of the largest, oldest mills in the region and is virtually intact. Typical of the wind-driven mills of the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, it helped produce the sugar for which Barbados used to be famous throughout the world. Housed inside the mill is a display of old photographs.
Bob's closeup of Morgan Lewis Mill

Bob's closeup of Morgan Lewis Mill

Working farm next to the Mill

Working farm next to the Mill


We drove up Cherry Tree Hill (also free)
Coastal Views from Cherry Tree Hill

Coastal Views from Cherry Tree Hill


No cherry trees still exist here; in fact, the approach to Cherry Tree Hill is a road canopied by magnificent old mahogany trees which were introduced into Barbados after the Treaty of Paris in 1763. Then you emerge to see a spectactular view of the entire east coast of the island and the Atlantic Ocean
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and then went to St. Nicholas Abbey.

St. Nicholas Abby sign at the entrance

St. Nicholas Abby sign at the entrance

Road to St Nicholas Abby

Road to St Nicholas Abby

This is not a religious institution. St Nicholas Abbey is a plantation house in Saint Peter, Barbados, and is one of only three genuine Jacobean mansions in the Western Hemisphere. (The other Bajan one is Drax Hall and the third one in the Western Hemisphere is Bacon's Castle in Virginia)
Bob's photo of the trees (and me) walking in from the parking lot

Bob's photo of the trees (and me) walking in from the parking lot


Distinguishing features are: curved Dutch gables, chimney stacks and coral stone finials.

St. Nicholas Abbey from outside the gates

St. Nicholas Abbey from outside the gates


St Nicholas Abbey from the side

St Nicholas Abbey from the side

Looking up at the house

Looking up at the house


another angle

another angle


Arrived there at the same time as a passel of local school children,
School kids at the entrance

School kids at the entrance

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who appeared to be about middle school age. We therefore were somewhat impeded in our tour of the house because groups of students were going through at the same time. Fortunately, we heard about the rare 1930 movie of life on the plantation at 11:00 am. We were in time to see most of these 'home movies'. They were one of the most interesting things we saw in Barbados. (one of the highlights of our trip).

After the movie we toured the house and grounds. Built in 1650, it is not an Abbey at all, and never was.
91215_08.jpg91215_03.jpgPhoto out the window

Photo out the window


It is surrounded by sugarcane fields and has been in the same family for many years. Inside, there is a Chinese Chippendale staircase and fine antiques and china. There is a particularly interesting example of an early 'recliner'.
Early recliner

Early recliner

looking out the window

looking out the window

Window

Window

The gardens and outbuildings are also interesting .
Garden

Garden

00001240-001.jpgbath house

bath house

Tree has spines all over the trunk

Tree has spines all over the trunk

Tree with spines from a distance

Tree with spines from a distance

After out visit to St. Nicholas Abbey we went to the Barbados Wildlife Reserve
Sign at the entrance - Barbados

Sign at the entrance - Barbados


The sign at the entrance says:

WELCOME TO THE BARBADOS WILDLIFE RESERVE
The reserve is designed for you to relax and to take the time to discover a beautiful mahogany forest while enjoying some of the unique wildlife of Barbados. Once inside you are free to mingle with wild monkeys, hares, turtles, birds etc. So please follow the rules. Booklets are available for purchase and will answer most of your questions so that your experience here is both enjoying and enriching"

We had lunch here.
Grackle on Our lunch table

Grackle on Our lunch table

There were a lot of school kids visiting when we went. It was very interesting.

Flamingo pond

Flamingo pond

Turtle wandering down the path

Turtle wandering down the path

bird cage

bird cage

The Wildlife Reserve was across the road from the Farley Hill National Park in the parish of St.Pete. So that was where we went next. The house dates back to 1818. It became one of the most impressive mansion in Barbados. In the mid-nineteenth century the property was owned by Sir Graham Briggs, a wealthy British planter and legislator. Briggs improved not only the house, but also the gardens, importing many new plants and trees into the island. In 1957, the house was restored and used in the film Island in the Sun .The film is about race relations and interracial romance set in the fictitious island of Santa Marta. Two of the stars were Harry Belafonte and Joan Fontaine. The film was controversial at the time of its release for its portrayal of an interracial romance.

Farley Hill was destroyed by fire in 1965
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and the destroyed mansion was not restored. It was was officially opened as a national park by HM Queen Elizabeth II in 1966, the same year Barbados gained independence. We were there two days before Bajan Independence Day.
Bob walking in to Farley Hill

Bob walking in to Farley Hill


Farley Hill House

Farley Hill House


Bob's photo of me in front of the ruins

Bob's photo of me in front of the ruins


We took a lot of photos of the ruins

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That night, we had a Bajan Buffet at a review called at "1627 And All That " As we walked into the venue, we saw this horse sculpture made of metal.
Horse sculpture

Horse sculpture


The show had a steel drum band, and stiltwakers. It detailed the island's history and cultural development The food and drink included Bajan hors d'oeuvres, complimentary 17th century rum bar, a Barbadian buffet dinner.

Breakfast - tip B$2.00

Drove up the east coast - Morgan Mill donation B$1.40
Snacks B$3.60
St. Nicholas Abbey - on Heritage pass
Farley Hill two admissions and book B$5.00
Barbados Wildlife and Grenade Hill B$ 40.00
Two Tonic waters B$6.00
1627 Dinner and show for two B$180.00

Posted by greatgrandmaR 16:23 Archived in Barbados Tagged landscapes children birds ruins barbados Comments (0)

Friday November 29th

Shopping


View Five Visits to Barbados & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

We had to get some sunglasses for Bob who had forgotten to pack his. We went to one of the smaller markets and bought stuff for lunch including something called a 'pipe' which was a very dense pastry.
Bob in sunglasses, but not from Barbados

Bob in sunglasses, but not from Barbados

We went to the Super Centre Ltd. in Holetown looking for cheap sunglasses.
Holetown

Holetown

But they were all designer type sunglasses and Bob thought they were too expensive. We found the cheapest sunglasses at a big new supermarket near the roundabout which I think is called Julie'n Supermarket Ltd

Large supermarket - Barbados

Large supermarket - Barbados

We visited Andromeda Gardens. Andromeda was developed in 1954 by the late horticulturist Iris Bannochie for her weekend retreat. It soon became a memorable garden and she opened it to the public. She left the property to the National Trust in 1988. It is named for the Greek goddess Andromeda who was chained to a rock - probably because of the huge limestone boulders in this area.
Andromeda Botanic Gardens

Andromeda Botanic Gardens


Andromeda Gardens is run by the Barbados National Trust.
Lily pond - Bathsheba

Lily pond - Bathsheba


Steps with leaf prints

Steps with leaf prints


When we went it was part of the Heritage Pass ticket. However we had already used up our tickets, so we had to pay. The garden spreads over six acres and contains orchids, exotics and shrubs. It is one of the finest collections of plants in the region.
Variegated Shell Ginger

Variegated Shell Ginger


Escaping bulb?

Escaping bulb?


There is a Best of Barbados shop and also a small cafe at the garden entrance. The Best Of Barbados shops carry only high quality and well designed gifts all "made or designed in Barbados". I always prefer to buy gifts for the folks back home that were actually made at the place where I am visiting. This place is a cornecopia of really nice local gifts. They have water colour prints of the islands, ranges of kitchen and tableware accessories, jewellery, T-shirts and children's clothing, cookery books, board games, pottery, stationery, glass, ceramics and much more. One of the more recent projects was the production of the video Beautiful Barbados. The nicest thing I bought was the locally produced place mats which were on our breakfast talbe every morning. They are very useful. I also got T-shirts, a Bajan game that the children play, a pot holder and a watercolor of the chattel houses.
Art work depicting a chattel house - Holetown

Art work depicting a chattel house - Holetown


Then went down to the southern end to Daphne's Sea Shell Studio "She Sells Sea Shells...." I thought this place sounded interesting so we tracked it down. Daphne had women's clothing made on the island, hand painted clothing, T-shirts that could have the picture of your choice applied, pictures frames, shell mirrors, ceramic ornaments, scarves and many other items. I bought some clothing and T-shirts. I cannot tell you how to get to this place which is in the middle of nowhere. It was a road like this one
Road between sugar cane fields (driving on left)

Road between sugar cane fields (driving on left)

Apparently she also has a place at 2nd Street, Holetown on the West Coast

We came back to Bathsheba. On the way I photographed some of the bus signs
Emmy Borne Highway

Emmy Borne Highway


There are several kinds of buses all quite reasonable in price. All routes are marked by bus stops which say "TO CITY" for buses that are going to Bridgetown or "Out Of City" for buses going the other direction.
Bus stop by side of the road

Bus stop by side of the road


TO City Bus Stop Sign

TO City Bus Stop Sign

The problem is that Bridgetown is the hub of all the routes. So if you want to go from say Bathsheba to Folkestone, you have to go to Bridgetown and transfer, and this may take some considerable time. Or if you want to use buses, you could stay closer to the center of the action instead of way out in Bathsheba like we did.

Note Since they drive on the left, you will get the bus on the opposite side of the road that you would think.
Transport Board bus 1996(and our rental car on left) - Barbados

Transport Board bus 1996(and our rental car on left) - Barbados


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We had lunch in a park with the groceries we bought
Bobs picture of me

Bobs picture of me

my picture of Bob

my picture of Bob

When we were there, the big surfing competition was at the end of November. Now it is held November 3-5 by the Barbados Surfing Association. There is apparently good surfing on the Atlantic coast most of the time. This area is called the Soup Bowl. Because it is on the Atlantic, with a long fetch to the nearest land, the East Coast is home to the most consistent breaks on Barbados. When the waves meet the Continental Shelf the swell rumbles across the reefs to create world class waves that are for the more experienced surfer. It also makes swimming very risky
Looking north to Bathsheba - Bathsheba

Looking north to Bathsheba - Bathsheba

Coast along in front of the town - Bathsheba

Coast along in front of the town - Bathsheba


Surfers in 1996 during competition

Surfers in 1996 during competition

Streets of Bathsheba during surfing competition

Streets of Bathsheba during surfing competition

Not being a surfer, I would not know, but I found this quote.

The New York Times wrote in March '09: “'I’ve been going for over 20 years, and I’d put Soup Bowl as one of the top three waves in the world,' said Kelly Slater, the Tiger Woods of surfing, who recently won his ninth world championship. 'It’s got a really good curve and allows all sorts of maneuvers and airs.'”. There are surf shops throughout the island, where you can rent boards, get surfing lessons or buy surfing equipment. The best time of year for surfing is between November and June

We stayed in and had dinner at our hotel (the Edgewater hotel)

Expenses for today (in Barbados dollars)
Breakfast tip B$2.00
Andromeda Gardens - admission for 2 B$20.00
Best of Barbados shopping for gifts B$254.05
Lunch in park (previously bought groceries)
Sea Shell Studio shopping for gifts B$1002.00
Dinner at Hotel B$50.00@

Posted by greatgrandmaR 17:00 Archived in Barbados Tagged shopping garden Comments (0)

November 30th - Bajan Independance Day

Using the Barbados Heritage Passport


View Five Visits to Barbados & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Saturday 11-30 - this was the Bajan Independence 30th anniversary date and it looked as if it was going to rain. Went to Harrison's Cave (missing the rain - it rained while we were underground) . We wanted to see Harrison's Cave because we heard that the tourists rode electric trains. That was true It has stalactites, stalagmites, waterfalls, and pools. Harrison's Cave was first documented in 1796, but was re-discovered by Danish speleologist, Ole Sorenson, in 1970. Tours are by electric tram and run every half hour.
Bob's picture of me taking a picture of stalactite

Bob's picture of me taking a picture of stalactite


Stalactites

Stalactites

Harrison's Cave

Harrison's Cave

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We came out of the cave and it was raining. There were chains to train the rainwater down from the roof in the garden
Central garden of visitor's center in the rain

Central garden of visitor's center in the rain

And after the rain stopped, we went to Welshman's Hall Gully (free for the anniversary for Bajans). Harrison's Cave and Welshman's Hall Gully are two aspects of the same thing. Welshman's Hall Gully is a cave that has collapsed at some time in the past. Welchman Hall Gully, located in the parish of St.Thomas, is a three-quarter mile (1.2km) long "gully" (really a garden) and home to a number of tropical plants trees, including nutmeg, bamboo, clove and palms. There was a self guiding tour which identified various interesting plants such as the toothpick tree. The green monkeys are supposed to inhabit this area, but we didn't see any - they are more likely to be around in the very early morning or in the evening. We went in on the Heritage Passport.
View from the end of Welshman's - Barbados

View from the end of Welshman's - Barbados

3441060-Welshman_Hall_Gully_Barbados.jpg3441058-Welshman_Hall_Gully_Barbados.jpgToothpick tree

Toothpick tree

Back along the path

Back along the path


Prof P.W. RICHARDS (Cambridge) speaking to a meeting of the British Bryological Society in 1990 on "My first steps in tropical bryology." said: "My first step in tropical bryology was when I set foot on Barbados, August, 1929,.. as a member of the Oxford Exploration Club's expedition. In Welshman's Hall Gully I saw some epiphyllous liverworts..."

And finished up at Gun Signal Hill (another one on the Barbados Passport). This was named as one of the four points where guns were to be placed to give alarm in the event of an invasion, so it is likely that the name Gun Hill goes back nearly 300 years. When the signal stations were established in 1818–1819, it became the key link in the chain, passing signals from Highgate east to Moncrieffe on the cliffs of the St. John/St. Philip border, and north to the Cotton Tower, Grenade Hall and Dover Fort (and vice versa). But Gun Hill was also the typical 'Hill Station' of the tropics, used as a convalescent station for the troops, and for evacuation of the Garrison in times of epidemics of yellow fever and once (in 1854) of cholera.

That evening, we walked from the Edgewater around to the Round House which is both a restaurant and a hotel. It is round, hence the name. They had live music and it was pretty good. The food was good, but I don't remember exactly what we had. A review from Jan 2002 says:
Road outside the Round House

Road outside the Round House

Parking lot from the road

Parking lot from the road

Round House from the road

Round House from the road


"Food served was Caribbean cusine, mostly bajan. I started out by having a split pea type of soup followed by a salad. ... bread which was fresh and very good...the main course.. the fisherman's platter which was one of the specials of the night. it had consisted of some dolphin, flying fish and shrimp, along with some pea's and rice. dinner for two wasn't too bad, it came to around $75.00 US($150.00 bajan) plus a tip"

Expenses
Gas 6.5 liters B$10.00

Dinner at the Round House for two B$112.70

Posted by greatgrandmaR 10:56 Archived in Barbados Comments (0)

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